Vaccines and Medicines


Before traveling in Haiti consider the following CDC recommendations to ensure a healthy visit.

Check the vaccines and medicines list and visit your doctor (ideally, 4-6 weeks) before your trip to get vaccines or medicines you may need.

All travelers

You should be up to date on routine vaccinations while traveling to any destination. Some vaccines may also be required for travel.

ROUTINE VACCINES: Make sure you are up-to-date on routine vaccines before every trip. These vaccines include measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine, diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis vaccine, varicella (chickenpox) vaccine, polio vaccine, and your yearly flu shot.

Most Travelers

Get travel vaccines and medicines because there is a risk of these diseases in the country you are visiting.

HEPATITIS A
CDC recommends this vaccine because you can get hepatitis A through contaminated food or water in Haiti, regardless of where you are eating or staying.

MALARIA
You will need to take prescription medicine before, during, and after your trip to prevent malaria. Your doctor can help you decide which medicine is right for you, and also talk to you about other steps you can take to prevent malaria. See more detailed information about malaria in Haiti.

TYPHOID
You can get typhoid through contaminated food or water in Haiti. CDC recommends this vaccine for most travelers, especially if you are staying with friends or relatives, visiting smaller cities or rural areas, or if you are an adventurous eater.

Some travelers

Ask your doctor what vaccines and medicines you need based on where you are going, how long you are staying, what you will be doing, and if you are traveling from a country other than the US.

HEPATITIS B
You can get hepatitis B through sexual contact, contaminated needles, and blood products, so CDC recommends this vaccine if you might have sex with a new partner, get a tattoo or piercing, or have any medical procedures.

RABIES
Rabies can be found in dogs, bats, and other mammals in Haiti, so CDC recommends this vaccine for the following groups:

  • Travelers involved in outdoor and other activities (such as camping, hiking, biking, adventure travel, and caving) that put them at risk for animal bites.
  • People who will be working with or around animals (such as veterinarians, wildlife professionals, and researchers).
  • People who are taking long trips or moving to Haiti
  • Children, because they tend to play with animals, might not report bites, and are more likely to have animal bites on their head and neck.

Additional Travel Health Notices

Be aware of current health issues in Haiti. Learn how to protect yourself:

Zika Virus in Haiti
August 05, 2016 Local transmission of Zika virus infection (Zika) has been reported. Local transmission means that mosquitoes in the area have been infected with Zika virus, spreading it to people. 
Chikungunya in the Caribbean
May 14, 2015 In December 2013, the World Health Organization (WHO) reported cases of chikungunya in Saint Martin. Additional cases were reported in other islands in the Caribbean. This is the first time that local transmission of chikungunya has been reported in the Americas. CDC recommends that travelers to the Caribbean protect themselves from mosquito bites.

 

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